Six Deadly Pool Purchasing Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

The six deadly pool purchasing mistakes are frequently made as a result of simply not being informed and Aufstellbecken knowing what questions to ask. Avoiding these mistakes could save you thousands of dollars and hours of heartache and frustration.

So you want to buy a pool but don’t know where to start? Perhaps knowing the common mistakes people make when purchasing a pool will help you start off on the right foot. Everyday, people get “duped” into buying the wrong pool, the wrong way, with no recourse or protection. These same people wind up being dissatisfied and even angry because their expectations weren’t met.

Throughout my long career in the pool industry, I have met many people who have made serious mistakes when they purchased their pool. Every year it seems as though I hear the same stories over and over. As a result of talking with scores of pool owners and through my own years of experience in the industry, I have concluded that there are six common mistakes that people make when purchasing a pool.

The Solution to Avoiding the
Six Deadly Pool Purchasing Mistakes is. . .
Ask the right questions! It’s simple. If you ask the right questions, you’ll uncover 90 percent of the potential problems that most pool purchasers commonly face. There’s always that 10 percent chance that something will happen that you couldn’t have foreseen; but, for the most part, you’ll be able to avoid almost any surprise.

However, if you’re like most other pool purchasers, you know so little about pools or pool construction that you don’t even know what questions to ask. That is why I wrote this special report just for you. After reading this report, you will be one of those few pool purchasers who “know what they’re talking about.”
The first questions you need to ask yourself when thinking about buying a pool are:

1. Why do I want a pool?
2. What will my family and I use the pool for?
3. Who is going to maintain the pool?

Why are these questions so important? Before you can decide “what” type of pool you want, you need to understand “why” you want a pool. Is it for family recreation, entertaining guests, physical therapy, exercise, personal recreation or just to “keep up with the Jones’?”

Knowing the answer to these questions will help you avoid the first deadly pool purchasing mistake, which is. . .

Mistake #1:
Not Designing Your Pool for its Intended Purpose
You might have heard the phrase, “Form follows function.” To know what type of pool you want, you need to know what you’ll be using it for. The type of pool you’ll select should depend on what you’ll be using it for.

More often than not, people considering the purchase of a pool have a specific purpose in mind. It is important to write this down and have it ready when you start to talk to pool builders.
For instance, if you are going to use your pool mostly for family entertainment, then you will want to include safety features such as gating or fencing that will control access to the pool. If your primary use is for entertainment, then you may consider mood lighting features with special landscaping features, such as waterfall features in and around the pool. If you want to build a pool for physical therapy or exercise, you might include a longer shallow area for swimming or perhaps built in spa jets in the seat, pull up bars, or even a smaller pool with swim jets.
The Myth of the Large Pool
An interesting phenomenon frequently happens when the majority of first-time pool buyers desire a large pool with a deep end and a diving board. After about a year of pool use, new owners discover that the deep end rarely gets used and the diving board becomes more of a safety hazard. Most of the games that are pla
yed by the kids are done in the shallow end and that’s where the adults spend 95 percent of their time. Because they decided to build a large pool with a deep end, only 35 percent of the pool gets utilized, resulting in unnecessary expense and low usage. It’s also important to consult with your insurance agent regarding increased premiums with diving boards.

Fencing is always an important element of your pool, not only for child safety but to provide a certain level of privacy. You may consider a retaining wall if your yard is on a slope so that you can step down to the pool, providing you more privacy. Many pool builders will try to talk you into elevating the level of your pool if your yard has a slope. Simply because there’s less dirt to remove, builders can cut trucking expenses. This can leave you with an inground pool that has an above ground look.

You should also have an understanding or vision of what you want your entire backyard to look like, not just your pool. Your pool should compliment your existing backyard and integrate with your intended landscaping goals, both now and in the future.

Here are some other points to consider when designing your pool:

1. Access – Ensure there is easy access to your pool from your house, restroom or entertainment area. You might want to consider how patios, decks or walkways are positioned to provide a safe and simple entrance and exit between your home and your pool.

2. Lines and Cables – Before settling on a location, you need to ensure that there are no electrical or telephone wires, sewer or septic lines or buried pipes.

3. Drainage – Water needs to drain away from the pool to avoid standing water or dirt and mud getting into the pool. This is especially important if you’re in a location that has a history of flooding.

4. Add-Ons – If you plan to install a diving board, spa, slide or waterfall, make sure that you plan for adequate deck space for each add-on.

5. Sheds – A common method of protecting equipment is to build an equipment shed close to the pool.

6. Sun vs Shade – The sun can help to keep your pool water warm; however, placing your pool under trees can result in a lot of extra maintenance.

7. Covenants – Find out if there are any subdivision covenants regarding the construction of pools.

To obtain a building permit, it is generally required to get a survey or plot plan of your entire property. In fact, you should already have one from when you bought your home. The survey will help you to decide where to locate your pool and any other accessories.

Make sure you schedule an initial on-site consultation so that your pools primary functions and activities are reflected in the design. Furthermore, an on-site consultation should urge you to consider the overall vision of what you want your backyard.

Mistake #2
Choosing the Wrong Pool “Container”

There are three basic types of in-ground pools: concrete/gunite, fiberglass, and vinyl liner.

No matter what type of pool you choose, you will be required to perform a certain amount of maintenance. However, each type of pool provides its own maintenance challenges. It’s important to understand these challenges by pool type before you make your selection.

Concrete/Gunite Pools
Concrete and gunite (a type of reinforced concrete) are the most common in-ground pool types because they have been on the market longer than the new, more efficient types of pools.

Concrete and gunite are sprayed over a framework of steel rods and wire mesh, then coated with plaster to give the pool a smooth, printable surface. Today, concrete and gunite pools are most commonly used for commercial and public swimming pools.

The nice thing about concrete and gunite pools is that you can virtually build them in any shape or form that you wish. Unfortunately, it is the most expensive of the three types of pools and it takes a long time to build.

Furthermore, concrete and gunite is porous, therefore providing small areas for algae and bacteria to grow. In addition, it can easily crack and chip with the change of the temperature and weather conditions, providing even more areas for algae and bacteria to grow. This is why concrete and gunite pools require the most maintenance of the three types of pools, costing $100 or more a month to maintain. It is also rough on the kids feet, and because kids will stay in the pool for extended length’s of time makes this extremely damaging to the skin.

Concrete and gunite pools require periodic annual or semi annual pool draining for cleaning purposes. When the pool is drained, the cracks in the concrete and gunite need to be repaired and the pool siding acid-washed and perhaps re plastered, if necessary. Acid washing is necessary every one to three years, depending on water condition. Acid washing does remove a layer of plaster or mar cite. Usually, after the second acid wash you can expect to re plaster the pool.

Vinyl Liner Pools
Vinyl liner pools use a high-density vinyl lining, offering a cosmetic textured pool surface. The lining is “seamed” together throughout the sides of the pool. Polymer or steel walls are bolted and fastened together on concrete flooring. The vinyl liner is spread over the floor and paneled walls and connected to the top of the walls by a vinyl rib at the outside edge of the liner.

The upfront cost of vinyl lined pools can be inexpensive when compared with concrete and gunite pools and take much less time to install. However, the maintenance on vinyl lined pools is high because the liner can be easily scratched or cut, especially if there will be toys or hard objects in the pool (even mechanical pool cleaners!). To repair a vinyl lined pool, you’ll need to replace the entire lining, which can cost from $1,500 to $3,900 or more depending on the time of the season for replacement.

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